Frequently Asked Questions - All FAQs

FAQs - All FAQs

Do people who are excellent skiers return to the level of excellence that they were used to, and in what time length (from your knowledge and experience with such people)?

Normally they do. I had one going back after 3 weeks, but I would take 3 months. Skiing with resurfacing, even with a total hip should give no problems.

Do people who are excellent skiers return to the level of excellence that they were used to, and in what time length (from your knowledge and experience with such people)?

Normally they do. I had one going back after 3 weeks, but I would take 3 months. Skiing with resurfacing, even with a total hip should give no problems.

Do people who are excellent skiers return to the level of excellence that they were used to, and in what time length (from your knowledge and experience with such people)?

Normally they do. I had one going back after 3 weeks, but I would take 3 months. Skiing with resurfacing, even with a total hip should give no problems.

Everything like they feel. For general rehab you could take 6 weeks, 3 months. If patients want to progress harder they can have longer or more frequent physiotherapy, but this would then be more like fitness training! Physiotherapy in resurfacing is more guiding the patients then making them to work out exercises too fast and too hard. Passive forced flexion of the hip should not be done. It will often lead to groin pain.
Everything like they feel. For general rehab you could take 6 weeks, 3 months. If patients want to progress harder they can have longer or more frequent physiotherapy, but this would then be more like fitness training! Physiotherapy in resurfacing is more guiding the patients then making them to work out exercises too fast and too hard. Passive forced flexion of the hip should not be done. It will often lead to groin pain.
Everything like they feel. For general rehab you could take 6 weeks, 3 months. If patients want to progress harder they can have longer or more frequent physiotherapy, but this would then be more like fitness training! Physiotherapy in resurfacing is more guiding the patients then making them to work out exercises too fast and too hard. Passive forced flexion of the hip should not be done. It will often lead to groin pain.
Only severe osteopenic bone is a potential risk for fracture. Other reasons for fractures are technical, or avascular necrosis of the femoral head.
Only severe osteopenic bone is a potential risk for fracture. Other reasons for fractures are technical, or avascular necrosis of the femoral head.
The approach is still questioned to be a risk factor for AVN. To lower the risk of AVN after hip resurfacing an approach different to the posterior or posterolateral approach is needed. The circumflex vessels should not be destroyed. Even with the today’s low incidence of AVN after hip resurfacing 3 other approaches can be used. (see approaches LINK)
  1. Anterior approach (Watson-Jones) (Smith-Peterson)
  2. Anterolateral approach
  3. Ganz-approach (anterior dislocation, after anterior capsulotomy and greater trochanter osteotomy)

All 3 approaches keep the vascularisation of the femoral head intact (circumflex vessels). The anterolateral approach has the disadvantage of abductor muscle destruction with possible persistent gaitproblems.

The Watson-Jones and Ganzapproach do not have this problem where the big disadvantage in the Ganzapproach is the greater trochanter osteotomy.

  1. Possible risk on not healing of the osteotomy (pseudarthrosis)
  2. 6 weeks partial weight bearing with 2 crutches are necessary (only 10 kg!)
  3. A second procedure for removal of the screws is necessary